USQ Podcasts
I Am Not My Crime - Steve

I Am Not My Crime - Steve

February 23, 2021

Steve tells you his story about life as a young man spent on the football field and in the boxing ring until drugs and alcohol replaced sport and life took a different direction. One night at the pub, Steve's irrational thoughts coupled with his drunken state caused an escalation of events between himself and other patrons. It was the next day, when Steve found out his actions had ended someone’s life, that he first realised how far into the darkness his own life had descended. This was the catalyst for Steve to start questioning himself. Steve talks about the value of education, and other people showing great faith in him, being central to the person he is today.

"I Am Not My Crime" features courageous people telling you the story about the crimes they have committed and their journey to redemption. As you make your way through this first season you will notice a couple of common themes: the importance of other people, opportunities for employment, and being welcomed back into society are what really matter for supporting change and a life lived differently. "I Am Not My Crime" has been produced to help you understand that for many people it is their circumstances that led them down the path to offending behaviour and that what somebody has done in the past is not an indication of who they are today.

Presented by University of Southern Queensland Criminologist Dr Suzanne Reich, each episode concludes with the latest research about why people commit the crime or crimes that have been discussed.

If this episode brings up any issues, and you need to talk to someone, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Alcoholics Anonymous on 1300 22 22 22, or Narcotics Anonymous on 1300 652 820. And blokes, if you think you might need help with anxiety, stress, depression or anger, you can speak with a counsellor from MensLine Australia on 1300 78 99 78.

Explore the University of Southern Queensland's Criminology and Criminal Justice degrees: Criminology and Criminal Justice - University of Southern Queensland (usq.edu.au)

 

REFERENCES

Bartels, L., Fitzgerald, R. & Freiberg, A. (2018). Public opinion on sentencing and parole in Australia. Probation Journal, 65(3):269-284. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264550518776763

Fitzgerald, R., Bartels, L., Freiberg, A., Cherney, A., & Buglar, S. (2016). How does the Australian public view parole? Results from a national survey on public attitudes towards parole and re-entry. Criminal Law Journal, 40:307-324.

Roberts, J. V. & Hough, M. (2005). The state of prisons: Exploring public knowledge and opinions. The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 44(3). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2311.2005.00373.x

Vandala, N. G., & Bendall, M. (2019). The transformative effect of correctional education: A global perspective. Cogent Social Sciences, 5(1). https://doi.org/ 10.1080/23311886.2019.1677122

I Am Not My Crime - Allan

I Am Not My Crime - Allan

February 16, 2021

As a child, Allan didn’t really belong. By about nine years of age, strong feelings of bitterness and anger were beginning to show, and by twelve he had already determined that one day he would kill someone. All through Allan’s story there is a recurring theme of faith. Allan grew up in a Christian family and despite his years of waywardness, Allan attributes the change in his life and his story of redemption to God having bigger plans for him.

"I Am Not My Crime" features courageous people telling you the story about the crimes they have committed and their journey to redemption. As you make your way through this first season you will notice a couple of common themes: the importance of other people, opportunities for employment, and being welcomed back into society are what really matter for supporting change and a life lived differently. "I Am Not My Crime" has been produced to help you understand that for many people it is their circumstances that led them down the path to offending behaviour and that what somebody has done in the past is not an indication of who they are today.

Presented by University of Southern Queensland Criminologist Dr Suzanne Reich, each episode concludes with the latest research about why people commit the crime or crimes that have been discussed.

If this episode has brought up any issues, and you need to talk to someone, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Alcoholics Anonymous on 1300 22 22 22, or Narcotics Anonymous on 1300 652 820. And blokes, if you think you might need help with anxiety, stress, depression or anger, you can speak with a counsellor from MensLine Australia on 1300 78 99 78.

Explore the University of Southern Queensland's Criminology and Criminal Justice degrees: Criminology and Criminal Justice - University of Southern Queensland (usq.edu.au)

 

REFERENCES:

Maruna, S. (2001). Making good: How ex-convicts reform and rebuild their lives. Washington, EC: American Psychological Association.

Hallet, M., & McCoy, J. S. (2014). Religiously motivated desistance: An exploratory study.  International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 59(8). doi:10.1177/0306624X14522112

I Am Not My Crime - David

I Am Not My Crime - David

February 9, 2021

In the rough neighbourhoods of Sydney, exposure to drugs and violence early in life was not out of the ordinary and involvement in criminal activity with peers provided David with a place to belong. After a few stints in juvenile detention for robbery, car thefts and drug related crime, David and his co-offenders committed one of the most serious crimes. Despite being charged and convicted of murder, David’s life has changed for the better. As you listen, you will notice that David attributes his change to a new perspective of himself, education, building relationships with good influences, and finding a purpose in life.

"I Am Not My Crime" features courageous people telling you the story about the crimes they have committed and their journey to redemption. As you make your way through this first season you will notice a couple of common themes: the importance of other people, opportunities for employment, and being welcomed back into society are what really matter for supporting change and a life lived differently. "I Am Not My Crime" has been produced to help you understand that for many people it is their circumstances that led them down the path to offending behaviour and that what somebody has done in the past is not an indication of who they are today.

Presented by University of Southern Queensland Criminologist Dr Suzanne Reich, each episode concludes with the latest research about why people commit the crime or crimes that have been discussed.

If this episode brings up any issues, and you need to talk to someone, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Alcoholics Anonymous on 1300 22 22 22, or Narcotics Anonymous on 1300 652 820. And blokes, if you think you might need help with anxiety, stress, depression or anger, you can speak with a counsellor from MensLine Australia on 1300 78 99 78.

Explore the University of Southern Queensland's Criminology and Criminal Justice degrees: Criminology and Criminal Justice - University of Southern Queensland (usq.edu.au)

 

REFERENCES

Costello, B. J., & Laub, J. H. (2019). Social control theory: The legacy of Travis Hirschi’s Causes of Delinquency. Annual Review of Criminology, 3:21-41. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-criminol-011419-041527

Hernandez, K. A., Ferguson, S., & Kennedy, T. D. (2020). Juvenile homicide offenders: Classifications/typologies. In K. A. Hernandez, S. Ferguson, & T. D. Kennedy. A closer look at juvenile homicide: Kids who kill, (pp. 7-17). Florida, USA: SpringerBriefs in Psychology.

Richards, K. (2011). What makes juvenile offenders different from adult offenders? Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice no. 409. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology. Retrieved from https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi409

I Am Not My Crime - Ben

I Am Not My Crime - Ben

February 2, 2021

Ben describes his downward spiral from social drug use, which eventually led to international drug trafficking. Through his time dealing drugs and his time in prison, Ben developed a whole range of transferrable skills, which shows that a former inmate can be very valuable to an employer.

"I Am Not My Crime" features courageous people telling you the story about the crimes they have committed and their journey to redemption. As you make your way through this first season you will notice a couple of common themes: the importance of other people, opportunities for employment, and being welcomed back into society are what really matter for supporting change and a life lived differently. "I Am Not My Crime" has been produced to help you understand that for many people it is their circumstances that led them down the path to offending behaviour and that what somebody has done in the past is not an indication of who they are today.

Presented by University of Southern Queensland Criminologist Dr Suzanne Reich, each episode concludes with the latest research about why people commit the crime or crimes that have been discussed.

If this episode brings up any issues, and you need to talk to someone, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Narcotics Anonymous on 1300 652 820.

Explore the University of Southern Queensland's Criminology and Criminal Justice degrees: Criminology and Criminal Justice - University of Southern Queensland (usq.edu.au)

 

REFERENCES

Bahr, S. J, Harris, L., Fisher, J. K. & Armstrong, A. H. (2010). Successful reentry: What differentiates successful and unsuccessful parolees? International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 54(5), 667-692. https://doi.org/10.1177/0306624X09342435

Bersani, B., Laub, J. H., & Nieuwbeerta, P. (2009). Marriage and desistance from crime in the Netherlands: Do gender and socio-historical context matter. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 25(1), 3-24. https://doi.org/ 10.1007/s10940-008-9056-4

Bushway, S. D., & Apel, R. (2012). A signaling perspective on employment-based reentry programming: Training completion as a desistance signal. Criminology & Public Policy, 11(1), 21-50.

Kirk, D. S. (2012). Residential change as a turning point in the life course of crime: Desistance or temporary cessation? Criminology, 50(2), 329-358. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-9125.2011.00262.x

Laub, J. H., Nagin, D. S., & Sampson, R. J. (1998). Trajectories of change in criminal offending: Good marriages and the desistance process. American Sociological Review, 63(2), 225-238.

Laub,   J. H., & Sampson, R. J. (2001). Understanding desistance from crime. In M. H. Tonry (Ed.), Crime and justice: A review of the research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Maruna, S. (2001). Making good: How ex-convicts reform and rebuild their lives. Washington, EC: American Psychological Association.

Moffitt, T. E. (1993). Adolescence-limited and life-course-persistent antisocial behavior: A developmental taxonomy. Psychological Review, 100(4), 674-701.

Sampson, R. J., & Laub, J. (1993). Crime in the making: Pathways and turning points through life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Simpson, P. L., Guthrie, J., Lovell, M., Doyle, M., & Butler, T. (2015). Assessing the public’s views on prison and prison alternatives: Findings from public deliberation research in three Australian cities. Journal of Public Deliberation, 11(2). Retrieved from: http://www.publicdeliberation.net/jpd/vol11/iss2/art1

Uggen, C. (2000). Work as a turning point in the life course of criminals: A duration model of age, employment, and recidivism. American Sociological Review, 65, 529-546.

Uggen, C., & Staff, J. (2001). Work as a turning point for criminal offenders. Corrections Management Quarterly, 5, 1-16.

 

I Am Not My Crime - Kate

I Am Not My Crime - Kate

January 26, 2021

Kate's escalating alcohol addiction led to the worst possible outcome. This became the catalyst for her own recovery and her pursuit in life to make good by helping others. Kate is not her real name.

"I Am Not My Crime" features courageous people telling you the story about the crimes they have committed and their journey to redemption. As you make your way through this first season you will notice a couple of common themes: the importance of other people, opportunities for employment, and being welcomed back into society are what really matter for supporting change and a life lived differently. "I Am Not My Crime" has been produced to help you understand that for many people it is their circumstances that led them down the path to offending behaviour and that what somebody has done in the past is not an indication of who they are today.

Presented by University of Southern Queensland Criminologist Dr Suzanne Reich, each episode concludes with the latest research about why people commit the crime or crimes that have been discussed.

If this episode brings up any issues, and you need to talk to someone, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Alcoholics Anonymous on 1300 22 22 22.

Explore the University of Southern Queensland's Criminology and Criminal Justice degrees: Criminology and Criminal Justice - University of Southern Queensland (usq.edu.au)

 

REFERENCES

Armstrong, K. A., Watling, H., Watson, A., & Davey, J. (2017). Profile of urban vs rural drivers detected drink driving via Roadside Breath Testing (RBT) in Queensland, Australia, between 2000 and 2011. Transportation Research, Part F 47:114-121.

Klepova, O. (2018). ‘Too high’: 30% of fatal crashes in Australia are due to drink driving. Retrieved from: https://www.sbs.com.au/language/english/too-high-30-of-fatal-crashes-in-australia-are-due-to-drink-driving

National Road Safety Partnership Program. (2016). Drink Driving. Retrieved from: https://cdn-nrspp.s3.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2017/03/21124016/drink_driving_fs-1.pdf

Rääbus, C. (2018). Getting home from a night out when you live in regional Australia. ABC Life. Retrieved from: https://www.abc.net.au/life/partying-in-regional-australia-with-no-public-transport/10324716

Transport Accident Commission. Drinking. Driving. They’re better apart. Retrieved from: https://tac.vic.gov.au/road-safety/tac-campaigns/drink-driving

Terer, K., & Brown, R. (2014). Effective drink driving prevention and enforcement strategies: Approaches to improving practice. Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice no. 472. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology. Retrieved from: https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi472

Career Insights - Imposter Syndrome

Career Insights - Imposter Syndrome

November 26, 2020
Do you have a little - or big - voice in the back of your mind causing you to second guess yourself? Or maybe telling you that your work is no good? Don't fear! Career Insights is here!
helps you navigate the world of employment, and help you realise your career goals.
 
In the final episode of Career Insights for the 2020 season, career development practitioner and positive and practical psychologist Dr Shari Walsh gives you some top tips on tuning out your anxiety and imposter.
 
Hosted by USQ Industry Relationship Consultant Katie Baker. Powered by the University of Southern Queensland and Phoenix Radio. Produced by USQ Creative Arts student Byron Queale. Artwork by Dyl Mac.
Career Insights - Careers in Agriculture

Career Insights - Careers in Agriculture

October 29, 2020
University of Southern Queensland Industry Relationship Consultant Katie Baker is here to help you navigate the world of employment, and help you realise your career goals.
 
Ever thought of heading out regional, but not sure of the job opportunities? Or how to overcome the challenges of working regionally - in particular in agricultural jobs?
 
USQ Alumnus Nicole McDonald is here to give her insight on the careers space in the regional and agriculture spaces, and provide some top tips for moving to a regional area!
 
Produced by USQ Creative Arts student Byron Queale. Artwork: Dyl Mac.
Career Insights - Jess van Vonderen

Career Insights - Jess van Vonderen

October 9, 2020

Ever wanted to work in the media? Not sure where to start?

USQ Alumnus and award-winning ABC journalist and presenter of ABC News Jessica van Vonderen shares her career story, and shares some top tips for those looking to getting into the media and journalism industries.

In this series, USQ Industry Relationship Consultant Katie Baker shows you how to navigate the world of employment so that you can realise your career goals.

Powered by the University of Southern Queensland and Phoenix Radio. Produced by USQ Creative Arts student Byron Queale. Artwork: Dyl Mac.

Career Insights - Harnessing Your Unemployment

Career Insights - Harnessing Your Unemployment

September 24, 2020

Where are the best places to find jobs? How do you know what skills are needed for today's workforce?

University of Southern Queensland Industry Relationship Consultant Katie Baker is here to help you navigate the world of employment, and help you realise your career goals.

USQ Career Development Practitioner Jennifer Luke and Senior Lecturer in Public Relations and employability expert Dr Chris Kossen share their top tips for getting out of unemployment and back into work!

Powered by the University of Southern Queensland and Phoenix Radio. Produced by USQ Creative Arts student Byron Queale. Artwork: Dyl Mac.

Career Insights - The Hidden Job Market

Career Insights - The Hidden Job Market

September 3, 2020
What is the hidden job market?
 
USQ Industry Relationships Consultant Katie Baker is here to help clear the air in the employability space, and to help you realise your career goals.
 
USQ Career Development Practitioner Shayne Lorac-Moon has all the hot tips on finding your way through the hidden job market.
 
Produced by USQ Creative Arts student Byron Queale.
 
Artwork: Dyl Mac.

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